If Your Pines Turn a Weird Grey…

2 weeks ago Nebby 0

Source: Crataegus Bonsai Blog.

…they might not be dead, they might just have spider mites. Mites are sneaky little arachnids that can transform our trees while we’re busy assuming all is well, to turn around one day and think, huh, wasn’t that a darker green last week? Pine showing spider mite damage from the year before, on the older needles with the yellow stippling The spider mite—there are several species—often forms a visible webbing if it lives on a juniper, but the webbing is often not apparent on a pine. In both instances the mite leaves a yellow stippling of the needle or leaf if seen close up, and a light yellowing or graying if seen from afar. The mite sucks out the interior of a cell and causes it to lose its green color. A tree can survive repeated mite attacks for multiple years, but it does keep the tree in a weakened state and should be taken seriously. Also, bonsai will look like a dust bomb exploded nearby so aesthetically this is the opposite of ideal. Spider mites on a fir, showing the speckling on the needles and webbing These mites are so small they are hard to see on the plant. To test for suspected mites a sheet of paper is held under the branch, which is vigorously swatted, and then the sheet is stroked with the palm. Note that vigorous swatting is used for errant apprentices as well, and a sheet of paper is often used as a flag of surrender.…

Go to the source blog (Crataegus Bonsai Blog) to read the full article: If Your Pines Turn a Weird Grey…